Schengen Agreement in Europe

The Schengen Agreement in Europe: Everything You Need to Know

The Schengen Agreement is an agreement among European countries that allows for the free movement of people across borders without the need for passports or other forms of identification. This agreement was signed in the town of Schengen, Luxembourg, on June 14, 1985, and has since been implemented in 26 European countries. This article will provide an overview of the Schengen Agreement and its impact on Europe.

What is the Schengen Agreement?

The Schengen Agreement is a treaty that allows for the free movement of people across the borders of participating European countries. The agreement created a common area without internal borders, where citizens can travel freely without the need for passports or other forms of identification.

The agreement also established a shared external border, which means that the participating countries share responsibility for the security of their external borders. This is done through common rules on visa policies, asylum policies, and police cooperation.

What are the countries involved in the Schengen Agreement?

There are currently 26 countries that have signed the Schengen Agreement and are part of the Schengen Area. These countries are:

Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland.

Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, and Romania are currently in the process of joining the Schengen Area, but are not yet fully part of it.

What are the benefits of the Schengen Agreement?

The Schengen Agreement has many benefits, including:

1. Free movement: The agreement allows citizens to travel freely across borders without the need for passports or other forms of identification.

2. Increased trade and tourism: With the ability to travel freely, trade and tourism have increased between the participating countries.

3. Greater security: The shared external border allows for greater security and cooperation among the participating countries.

What are the challenges of the Schengen Agreement?

While the Schengen Agreement has many benefits, there are also challenges that come with it, including:

1. Illegal immigration: The agreement has made it easier for individuals to enter the Schengen Area illegally, which has led to increased illegal immigration.

2. Border security: With the shared external border, there is a greater need for border security and cooperation among the participating countries.

3. Terrorism: The lack of internal borders has made it easier for terrorists to move between countries undetected.

Conclusion

Overall, the Schengen Agreement has had a significant impact on Europe, allowing for the free movement of people and increased cooperation among participating countries. While it has also presented challenges, the benefits of the agreement outweigh the challenges, and it continues to be an important part of European integration.